Florida's First Choice for Autism Support

Farewell to CARD

As I “retire” from CARD-USF to move on to a hundred other activities, I have been reflecting a lot lately on: how much I will miss everyone at CARD; how much I will miss USF, which has been part of my life since 1967; how much I will miss being a librarian, even if I’ve been kind of a “pretend” one for the last couple of decades; and how much I will miss keeping up on the latest research, publications, and news, though the osmosis effect of social media ensures that I won’t miss much.

Mostly, I am thinking about how much things have changed for families since my daughter was diagnosed in 1992:

  • Her original diagnosis of PDD-NOS no longer exists as a diagnosis
  • Asperger’s disorder no longer exists as a diagnosis
  • Children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in the early 90s were very likely to be placed in programs designed for children with emotional/behavioral disorders, or intellectual disabilities, but rarely in programs designed for children with ASD diagnoses. Very often, children with ASD were placed in center-based schools. We have watched education evolve from a dearth of teacher preparation and services, through developing expertise thanks to professional development efforts of school districts and organizations like CARD, through segregated settings at neighborhood schools, to a current landscape in which many more students are fully or partially included with their peers in regular education classes and activities.
  • Interventions have gone from consequence-based, punitive “treatments” to antecedent-based, positive supports that seek to make the whole environment supportive and oriented toward increased communication and prevention of challenging behaviors.
  • Community venues such as child care sites, summer camps, restaurants, movie theaters, theme parks, resorts, zoos, orchestras and museums have gone from being fairly unwelcoming environments, to seeking out training and support from CARD to open their doors and programming to customers, visitors and employees who have ASD.

One of the most beautiful advocacy movements that has emerged over the past twenty years has been the self-advocacy movement working for acceptance of all individuals with or without diagnoses. This movement has recently been represented most visibly by the author Steve Silberman, in his book NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity, published by Penguin Random House in 2015. Many public libraries have this book, or can get it via inter library loan if you are interested in reading it. This movement seeks to move from “awareness” to acceptance. Once individuals who have traditionally been marginalized by society develop their own voice and presence, it becomes impossible for them to continue being ignored, and changes happen quickly.

As the parent of an adult with ASD who is very challenged by social & communication issues, I will take with me into retirement a renewed sense of my daughter as an individual with unlimited potential who deserves to be accepted fully by her community, even if she needs a bit more assistance in developing her own voice. But it should be her voice – not the voice of well-meaning people thinking they are speaking for her.

Thank you CARD staff, families and friends, thank you everyone in CBCS and USF for the gifts of your friendship, wisdom, and insight. I leave here the better for having known and worked with all of you.

– Jean

jean and anna 2

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