Florida's First Choice for Autism Support

Archive for the ‘Resources’ Category

Hurricane Safety

HURRICANE SAFETY

With the uncertainty of Hurricane Dorian’s impact on Florida, now is a good time to prepare. CARD-USF has Hurricane Safety brochures in English and Spanish as well as a Hurricane Social Narrative. Also, be sure to register with the Special Needs Registry in your county at FLGetAPlan.com

Hurricane Safety (English):https://www.dropbox.com/…/CARD_2018HurricaneGuide_FINAL_dig…

Summer & Water Safety

water safety Header.png

It’s that time of year again, where the temperature and humidity rise so high you can’t go outside without sweating. And what better way to cool off than to take a nice dip in the water! Swimming is the go-to activity for Floridians in the summer, and whether at a pool or at the beach, it’s always a good time. But for children with autism, it can certainly present challenges that the parents may need to consider. We’ve got you covered here at CARD, with our most important tips for water safety.

Drowning is a serious concern for those with ASD and those concerns don’t seem to stop as the person gets older. Drowning can happen in an instant and in water as little as 2 inches deep. Parents, caregivers and anyone should be vigilant with children around water. If your family has a swimming pool, we suggest maintaining barriers around the perimeter of the pool, so that your child won’t be able to wander into it. Also, knowing CPR is always a positive in case of emergency.

It’s also important that children learn how to swim. If you’re an adult and you never learned, please consider doing so. There are many sites throughout CARD-USF’s 14 county service area that provide swimming lessons to individuals with special needs. That list can be found here. I’d also like to direct you to CARD-USF’s wonderful Water Safety brochure, which lays out many of the things I’ve discussed and so much more. If that’s not enough, the brochure has a long list of external resources you can check out on this topic.

Happy summer everyone! Stay cool and stay safe.

  • G. Sosso
Pool safety infographic

A great infographic from American Academy of Pediatrics

Tampa International Airport’s Autism Training & TPA 360 Program

In May, CARD provided an autism awareness training to many of the Guest Services staff and Airport Traffic and Police at Tampa International Airport as part of their effort to meet the needs of people with ASD. We were thrilled to learn about their TPA 360 Traveler Education Program.

Airline travel is often a break from the typical routine and can spark anxiety and stress in most families; especially those with individuals affected by autism. The friendly and supportive TPA 360 staff understand this and offer a “pre-travel” experience that invites families and individuals to visit the airport, take a tour of the areas they will be using during their actual flight, and practice going through the whole process from check-in, to security screening, to actually getting onto the aircraft!  This is like a “living social story” that provides a real experience and sets the expectations of all the travelers in a family.

If you travel or plan to take a flight out of Tampa, we encourage you to contact Tampa International Airport Guest Services  (813) 870-8759 Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. to book a TPA 360 tour.  For more information and a view of their webpage.

For more information on tips and resources for air travel and autism CARD-USF has created the Airports, Airplanes & Autism booklet. Access it here.

AIRPORT COVER

Mental Health Awareness Month

Happy May! May is Mental Health Awareness Month. Did you know, according to research (Ghaziuddin and Zafar, 2008) up to 80 percent of individuals with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum disorder have at least one co-occurring mental health disorder. Common co-occurring mental health disorders include ADHD, anxiety disorders, depression, mood disorders, and eating disorders.

For Parents:

It is important to make the point that there are other medical issues that need to be ruled out before a mental health diagnosis. However, if you have a child on the Autism Spectrum and suspect a mental health concern here are some signs and symptoms to be aware of: impulsivity, attention challenges, hyperactivity, aggression, irritability, crying, avoiding school, restricted or rigid rules with food, resistance to change, low frustration tolerance, bullying, unusual fears or worries. If you feel that you child may be having mental health concerns please contact your primary doctor for a referral for an mental health evaluation.

For Mental Health Practitioners:

Take a look at our mental health guide book to support you while working with individuals on the autism spectrum who have a co-occurring mental health disorder.

Guidebook

As always if you need assistance with resources please contact CARD-USF for assistance. We can be reached at (813) 974-2532 or Card-usf@usf.edu.

 

Written by Charisse Dawkins, LCSW

2013-03CARDfriendposter

We created these posters in 2013 and they continue to be very popular among school age children. You can download the PDF version here.

Autism & Religion

For millions of families around the world, religion plays an extremely important role in their lives. Entire societies have been formed based on a common belief in God or gods. Here in America, Sunday is an important day for many churchgoers, and the diversity of belief found here is unlike any other in the world. But what exactly is the relationship between religiosity and autism, if there’s one at all? While I would describe myself as spiritual, the majority of those I’ve met on the spectrum were not of that inclination? Among the ASD community, what exactly is the consensus?

Surprisingly, this was one of the most one-sided topics I’ve ever researched. Every source I found seems to point to there being a connection between autism and lack of religious belief. In this study, Catherine Caldwell-Harris – a psychology professor at Boston University, paints a pretty clear picture. One further study only further enhanced these findings, as it was discovered that those with autism were only 11% as likely as their neuro-typical counterparts to believe strongly in a God. People on the autism spectrum are not only more likely than average to be agnostic or atheist, but are more likely to reject organized religion if favor of their own personalized belief systems. That’s actually how I’d describe myself, so these findings definitely clicked with me.

But why exactly is this the case? The answer is actually simpler than you’d think. For hundreds of years, there’s been a strong divide between religion and science. The more logical and rational-minded you are, the lower your inclination towards faith. This relates to people on the autism spectrum, as it’s a well-known fact (which I have discussed in previous blogs) that we’re often logical, fact-based, straightforward thinkers who need to see evidence in front of us before we’ll believe anything. An excerpt from this article summarizes it quite well: “I recalled what Simon Baron-Cohen and others have written about autistic people’s tendency to systematize and our love of routine, rationality, and logic. All that makes sense, and I can see how a strongly rational person would reject religious dogma if it does not seem logical.”

Obviously, none of this is universal, as with most topics related to ASD. While it is true that those on the spectrum have a higher chance of being atheist/agnostic, it’s not a foregone conclusion. I know how important going to church, synagogue or mosque is for a lot of families out there, and if you have a child on the spectrum who makes going to service difficult, there are resources available. CARD-USF has their own resource for this topic; View it here.

faith

STEM Camp for Individuals with Disabilities

STEM_summer_flyer

For more information about the Summer STEM
Career Exploration program, please visit the link:
http://carrt.usf.edu/docs/STEM_summer_flyer.pdf

To register for this summer camp, please download the registration form at:
http://carrt.usf.edu/docs/STEM_summer_registration.pdf

Please email the filled form to: alqasemi@usf.edu and scarey3@usf.edu

For any questions or inquiries, please contact Dr. Redwan Alqasemi at 813-974-2115.

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