Florida's First Choice for Autism Support

Posts tagged ‘ADA’

Spectrum Employment Strategies

One focus here at CARD is helping adults on the spectrum find employment at a job where they can excel. Because of this, we know the struggles that these individuals will inevitably face on this crucial path. Even the most talented, hardworking of people with ASD can struggle with some social, communication, and behavioral issues that might dissuade potential employers from looking their way. Here in this blog, I want to highlight some of the strategies people on the spectrum can utilize to make themselves more appealing in the job market. If you follow these tips, hopefully it will help you take that next step that you deserve.

 
Knowledge is power, and the most important thing you can do for yourself is to know your rights. As a person diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, you are protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and the Rehabilitation Act. The ADA is, essentially, a “wide-ranging civil rights law that is intended to protect against discrimination based on disability”, while the Rehabilitation Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in programs conducted by Federal agencies. I highly suggest reading this, from their official website. It explains it all in a very easy to understand manner. Knowing all this is important so you are not taken advantage of. Companies are legally obligated to give you a fair chance just like everyone else, and as long as you realize this, you will be in good legal standing if you feel discriminated against.

 

Of course, just knowing your rights doesn’t guarantee you a job by any means. You still have to deserve the job in the employer’s eyes, so here are some things you can do to show that you will be a productive member of the team. First of all, realize that autism is not some crippling disease, but in fact something that makes you unique, and gives you a distinct skillset! Many people on the spectrum are lauded for their trustworthiness, reliability, creativity and low absenteeism. Stress these things in your job interview (if they apply to you, of course). Unfortunately, many employers have a negative stereotype of workers on the spectrum, so it’s up to you to prove to them that those things aren’t true, and that you would be a valuable asset to the team. Also, and this goes for everyone, not just those on the spectrum, but following up is essential if you want the job. Be persistent. Let them know that this is important to you. It will show them your determination, and will make them believe that you will be just as hard of a worker as someone not on the spectrum.

 
Now, getting employed is only half the battle. Keeping a job can be just as difficult, if not more so. That will be the topic of my next blog; until then, I hope these strategies will help you in your road to employment.Good luck!

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  • G. Sosso

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