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Posts tagged ‘Education’

Transition Planning: It’s Never Too Early To Start

transition

This is the third in a series of articles about transition planning. This article focuses on students in middle school. It is never too early to plan for transition to adult life. Preparing a young person for transition to adulthood is a gradual process stretching over several years. You may find the “transition roadmap” for middle school helpful in starting the journey: http://flfcic.fmhi.usf.edu/docs/FCIC_Employment_Roadmap.pdf

Involve your child in activities that foster self-respect and self-esteem, and enable gradually increasing independence. This may include participating in extracurricular activities that build on your child’s strengths and interests, such as playing an instrument in the band, auditioning for a play, or getting involved in 4-H. Assign specific tasks at home, and require that the tasks are done thoroughly and on time. Have your child join you in community activities that help others, such as cutting coupons for an elderly neighbor, cheering on friends competing in a marathon, or reading to a young child.

Take your child into the community, and point out occupations and the tasks and responsibilities of the persons doing those jobs. Encourage your child to talk about the occupation he/she might like to do as an adult. Highlight your child’s strengths and gifts. Expose your child to experts with similar strengths and gifts, such as attending a symphony concert for a budding musician.

In middle school, your child should become more involved in developing the goals on his/her IEP, and in self-assessing progress over time. Creating personal ownership of the IEP is a foundational base in developing your child’s self-determination skills. By the time your child is a 9th grader, he/she should be attending his/her IEP meeting, and possibly even chairing the meeting by grade 11 or 12. Did you know that a diploma option must be chosen in 9th grade (as per the new state statute)? Your child should be an active participant in making this important decision. More about that in the next article about transition…..

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CARD & HIPPY Program To Be Featured on News Channel 8

The Center for Autism and Related Disabilities at USF partners with the Florida HIPPY program (Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters)

The HIPPY program offers a structured home based model focusing on parent-child centered learning. This international parent involvement school readiness program uses an evidence based curriculum for children 3-5 years old. Parents, as the first teachers, are provided with the developmentally appropriate materials and books to help teach and strengthen their child’s cognitive, literacy and social/emotional skills.

Four years ago, CARD approached HIPPY about the idea of expanding the use of their curriculum to children with disabilities, specifically children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. This had not been tried before and we felt that CARD constituents would greatly benefit from this opportunity. After HIPPY successfully received a grant from the Children’s Board in Hillsborough County, we were off and running to find 16 children for our pilot group. We have been tracking the data on the enhancements that CARD has offered to the HIPPY curriculum as well as child outcomes. Our goal is to have our participants school ready to attend the least restrictive classroom environment.

We had the honor of having Gayle Guyardo from Channel 8 news join us for a session with a local family that CARD and HIPPY serves. This story will be featured on September 23 on the evening news. I hope you can take a moment to watch and if you know a family in Hillsborough County with a child aged 3 or 4 who can benefit from this program, please have them contact Beverly King at beverlyking@usf.edu.

Jossie3                             (Jossie, a HIPPY graduate, with Gayle Guyardo)

5th Annual Autism Health & Wellness Symposium

2014 CARD's Autism Health and Wellness Symposium Save the Date

It’s time again for CARD’s Annual Health & Wellness Symposium! Join us as we host our free one day conference aimed at uniting the community around health & wellness for individuals and families impacted by Autism Spectrum Disorder. Four presenters have been secured to share their expertise around health related topic areas; Caregiver Wellness, Food Aversion & Eating Challenges, Dental Care for Individuals with ASD, and Medical Visits for Individuals with ASD. Exhibitors will be present throughout the day and will share community resource information. We will also be providing Challenging Behavior Screenings as well as ASD Screenings. Appointments are not required for the Challenging Behavior Screenings.

Autism Spectrum Disorder Screenings will be scheduled for families with concerns regarding their child’s development on a case by case basis prior to the date of the event (Please contact Beverly King for more information to schedule your child for an ASD screening at beverlyking@usf.edu)

Register for the event today! https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cards-5th-annual-autism-health-wellness-symposium-tickets-12008913985

Transition Planning Series #2

transition

This is the second in a series of articles about transition planning at the secondary level for your child with Autism Spectrum Disorder.
On or before your child’s 16th birthday, transition services becomes an integral component of the Individual Educational Plan (IEP), better known as the Transition Individual Educational Plan (TIEP) at high school.
The TIEP must include a statement of the needed transition services, including (if appropriate) a statement of the school’s and each participating adult agency’s responsibilities or linkages before the student leaves school. “Transition services” means a coordinated set of activities for the student which are outcome-based to promote movement from school to post-school activities. Post-school activities may include post-secondary education, vocational training, integrated employment, continuing and adult education, and/or adult services focused on independent living and community participation.
The coordinated set of activities are based on the student’s needs, and take into account the student’s preferences and interests.The activities shall include the areas of instruction, community experiences, the development of employment, and other post-school adult living objectives; and, if appropriate, daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.
The TIEP is a dynamic document that may be revised at the IEP annual review, as the student moves closer and closer to graduation. It is important that you and your child are actively involved in developing and implementing the transition plan. The TIEP is the pathway to your child’s future.

– Sue Thomas, CARD Consultant – Adult Services

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CARD USF – Video Business Card

Learn more about CARD and what we can offer families, businesses and individuals impacted by autism.

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Nine Weeks down…Three more to go

Nine Weeks Down…Three More to go!

It is hard to believe that the first 9 weeks of school is over!  Now is a great time to review and really check in to see how your child is doing in their classes.  Most kids need the first nine weeks to “warm up” to new routines, teachers, peers, etc…however, if your child seems to be struggling to keep up, is showing a great amount of anxiety, or is exhibiting any other concerning behaviors, I encourage you to look deeper at what school life is truly like for them. 

There are so many services, accommodations and programs available for your child, through the public school system, that you may or may not be aware of.  More can always be done. 

Here are some suggestions if you are concerned about your child’s school performance, social interactions, behavior or overall functioning:

1.  Schedule a meeting with an advocate to review your child’s current IEP or 504 plan.  If your child does not have an IEP or 504 plan but feel they need additional help, an advocate can lead you in the right direction to get the evaluation process started.

2.  If you do have an IEP or 504, call a meeting.  You have the right to request an IEP meeting any time, as many times, as you want throughout the year.  You may also specify who you would like to attend the meeting.

3.  Put your correspondences with the school in writing including minor concerns or questions you may have for teachers.

4.  Consider having an outside, licensed therapist come and observe your child at school.  A new law has recently been passed that will allow for outside, licensed therapists to observe children at school.

5.  Get feedback from your child. Ask them what changes they would make, if they could, to make school easier, better, less stressful?  Ask your child to draw a picture about their day.  Have your child rate their day on a scale from 1-10.  Provide a visual emotion chart for children who are unable to verbalize their feelings when asked about school, a particular class or teacher.

6.  Attend a workshop or support group.  There are several webinars and local meetings/support groups that address these topics and provide a space to share your concerns about questions with other parents and professionals.

If you have additional questions or concerns regarding the above information, please feel free to contact Erica DuPont, LCSW Owner of ProTherapyPlus, LLC

www.protherapyplus.com

www.seemyiep.com

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