Florida's First Choice for Autism Support

Posts tagged ‘Employment’

Transitioning into the Working World

Out of all the issues we try to address here at CARD, there is perhaps none more important than how can we help kids on the spectrum, who just finished, or are finishing, high school successfully transition into the adult (working) world? It can seem like a monumental task at times, even downright impossible, but it’s not! I was in the exact same position when I graduated from Lakewood Ranch High School back in 2013, and my life sort of stalled until I found CARD, and of course the Learning Academy. They helped me a lot, and hopefully I can do the same thing for anyone reading this.

According to the Autism Society via the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of “June 2014, only 19.3 percent of people with disabilities in the U.S. were participating in the labor force – working or seeking work. Of those, 12.9 percent were unemployed; meaning only 16.8 percent of the population with disabilities was employed (By contrast, 69.3 percent of people without disabilities were in the labor force, and 65 percent of the population without disabilities was employed).” The difference between the 2 is enormous, and clearly speaks to some sort of correlation; such a gap cannot be mere coincidence. Now, to be fair, part of the blame does lie on those with the disabilities. Less than 20% of people on the spectrum were looking for work, and that is a huge part of the problem.

Many employers hear the negative stereotypes associated with workers with mental disabilities, and don’t want to take the risk of hiring them. Things like laziness, the inability to follow orders, taking longer to accomplish tasks, lack of social skills, etc. are just some of the reasons companies aren’t hiring from this demographic. And it cannot be denied that, for many young, and even full-grown adults, these things are an issue that plagues them. But, just like any other problem, it can be fixed if both the boss and employee are willing to work together and be understanding. Perhaps if more companies realized this, they could see some of the positive attributes people on the spectrum can bring; i.e. resourcefulness, creativity, unique perspectives and the ability to point out the little details others might miss.

So now we know a few of the issues, but how can we go about fixing them; i.e. making the transition? I think this article sums it up quite well, “For young adults who go directly into the employment world, it will also be critical for them to focus on their strengths and what brings them the greatest joy. They will want to explore different areas of the job market. Different work environments may help different individuals to excel. There are many opportunities for supported employment, where the employer offers supports to a worker with different challenges. Other individuals will require less support and may do better independently.” Basically, you need to find your passion, and there are many organizations that can help you out with that, including CARD!

Source: http://www.autism-society.org/what-is/facts-and-statistics/.

 

G. Sosso

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Spectrum Employment Strategies

One focus here at CARD is helping adults on the spectrum find employment at a job where they can excel. Because of this, we know the struggles that these individuals will inevitably face on this crucial path. Even the most talented, hardworking of people with ASD can struggle with some social, communication, and behavioral issues that might dissuade potential employers from looking their way. Here in this blog, I want to highlight some of the strategies people on the spectrum can utilize to make themselves more appealing in the job market. If you follow these tips, hopefully it will help you take that next step that you deserve.

 
Knowledge is power, and the most important thing you can do for yourself is to know your rights. As a person diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, you are protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and the Rehabilitation Act. The ADA is, essentially, a “wide-ranging civil rights law that is intended to protect against discrimination based on disability”, while the Rehabilitation Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in programs conducted by Federal agencies. I highly suggest reading this, from their official website. It explains it all in a very easy to understand manner. Knowing all this is important so you are not taken advantage of. Companies are legally obligated to give you a fair chance just like everyone else, and as long as you realize this, you will be in good legal standing if you feel discriminated against.

 

Of course, just knowing your rights doesn’t guarantee you a job by any means. You still have to deserve the job in the employer’s eyes, so here are some things you can do to show that you will be a productive member of the team. First of all, realize that autism is not some crippling disease, but in fact something that makes you unique, and gives you a distinct skillset! Many people on the spectrum are lauded for their trustworthiness, reliability, creativity and low absenteeism. Stress these things in your job interview (if they apply to you, of course). Unfortunately, many employers have a negative stereotype of workers on the spectrum, so it’s up to you to prove to them that those things aren’t true, and that you would be a valuable asset to the team. Also, and this goes for everyone, not just those on the spectrum, but following up is essential if you want the job. Be persistent. Let them know that this is important to you. It will show them your determination, and will make them believe that you will be just as hard of a worker as someone not on the spectrum.

 
Now, getting employed is only half the battle. Keeping a job can be just as difficult, if not more so. That will be the topic of my next blog; until then, I hope these strategies will help you in your road to employment.Good luck!

Visit our websites for more information about CARD or The Learning Academy

  • G. Sosso

There and Back Again: The Learning Academy

It always feels special to be able to gain a new perspective on something, and my most recent project is a perfect example of that. For those who may not know, I am a 2015 Learning Academy graduate now employed by CARD as a writer/copy-editor. It was the Learning Academy (TLA) that provided me with the skills I needed to hold down a job and cope with the real world, and now I get to repay them for all that they’ve done for me. I’m initiating a project where I’ll be tracking the progress of two current TLA students, Sean and Lizzy. I will be showcasing where they were at the beginning of the year, and how far they’ve come by the end. But that’s neither here nor there; the real focus of this blog is what a truly visceral experience it was going back into the TLA classroom, not as a wide-eyed, eager student, but as an employee, team member and someone of actual authority.

I caught my first glimpse of the new TLA class a couple months ago, during their orientation (which I remember mine like it was just yesterday!). I could see the looks of uncertainty on most of their faces, as well as a hint of cautious optimism. I can’t speak for them of course, but I can safely assume they were feeling the same torrent of emotions that I was; apprehension, hope, anticipation, joy and courage in the face of this new chapter of their lives. To be honest, when I went up to deliver my speech announcing the aforementioned project, I was very nervous. I had practiced what I wanted to say in my head a million times, and I had no problems speaking publicly last year when I was a student, but this time I had to make a good impression. I didn’t just represent myself and my own progress; I was a reflection of CARD and TLA as a whole. Luckily, I did not choke under the pressure, and received a warm reception.

My second meeting with the new class was far more low-key. In order to get a good feel for how things are going, I stopped by for the last half hour of class, and let me tell you, I can scarcely think of another time when I felt so much nostalgia. It was very tempting for me to raise my hand to answer some of the questions Megan was asking just as I had done last year, but considering I was no longer a student, I knew it would not be proper. It is a testament to Megan’s teaching ability that despite the fact that an entire year had passed, I still clearly remembered the lesson being taught, its real-world applicability, and how we used it to aid us in discovering an internship that we could succeed at.

I look forward to seeing how this year’s TLA class will fare, but from what I’ve seen thus far, I have the utmost confidence in them. And at the end of the year, when they all graduate, I’ll be watching fondly, knowing from personal experience just how special of a moment it truly is.

To learn more about the The Learning Academy at USF visit their website.

  • G. Sosso

Rehabilitation Services Administration Commissioner Visits the Learning Academy!

On July 9, 2014, Janet LaBreck, Commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), visited the University of South Florida, along with RSA Program Specialist Christyne Cavataio and Department of Education Chief of Staff Kathy Hebda. Accompanying Commissioner LaBreck were Aleisa McKinlay, Director of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Robert Doyle, Director of the Division of Blind Services, and John Howell, Area Director, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. Three programs were showcased for their work in training and research for vocational rehabilitation. Among these were two College of Behavioral and Community Sciences programs: the Department of Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling and the Learning Academy and Employment Services, Department of Child and Family Studies.

The visit focused on programs that support the RSA’s mission to establish a job-driven vocational rehabilitation technical assistance center to offer training and technical assistance to those with disabilities. The overarching goal to help provide skills and competencies to those with disabilities fits with these CBCS programs, as well as USF’s Rehabilitation Engineering Program and its Center for Assistive, Rehabilitation & Robotics Technologies (CARRT), which was also showcased for Commissioner LaBreck.

The Learning Academy and Employment Services program helps provide individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder with the skills needed to engage in competitive employment.
The academy offers a customized transition program that assists in preparing young adults diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder for employment. The Learning Academy provides services, supports and experiential opportunities that develop and enhance each student’s independence in meeting personal career goals. You can see student success stories at the center’s main website.
“Our students engage in self-discovery and career exploration through classroom activities and real-life experiences such as internships and peer mentoring,” said Dr. Karen Berkman, Director of Learning Academy Services at USF. “We were proud to share that we have over a 60% success rate helping individuals meet their benchmarks for placement in their career choice, well above the Florida average of 28%.”

The Learning academy will welcome its 6th class in late August. The employment services component accepts participants on an ongoing basis.

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