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Posts tagged ‘Faith’

Autism & Religion

For millions of families around the world, religion plays an extremely important role in their lives. Entire societies have been formed based on a common belief in God or gods. Here in America, Sunday is an important day for many churchgoers, and the diversity of belief found here is unlike any other in the world. But what exactly is the relationship between religiosity and autism, if there’s one at all? While I would describe myself as spiritual, the majority of those I’ve met on the spectrum were not of that inclination? Among the ASD community, what exactly is the consensus?

Surprisingly, this was one of the most one-sided topics I’ve ever researched. Every source I found seems to point to there being a connection between autism and lack of religious belief. In this study, Catherine Caldwell-Harris – a psychology professor at Boston University, paints a pretty clear picture. One further study only further enhanced these findings, as it was discovered that those with autism were only 11% as likely as their neuro-typical counterparts to believe strongly in a God. People on the autism spectrum are not only more likely than average to be agnostic or atheist, but are more likely to reject organized religion if favor of their own personalized belief systems. That’s actually how I’d describe myself, so these findings definitely clicked with me.

But why exactly is this the case? The answer is actually simpler than you’d think. For hundreds of years, there’s been a strong divide between religion and science. The more logical and rational-minded you are, the lower your inclination towards faith. This relates to people on the autism spectrum, as it’s a well-known fact (which I have discussed in previous blogs) that we’re often logical, fact-based, straightforward thinkers who need to see evidence in front of us before we’ll believe anything. An excerpt from this article summarizes it quite well: “I recalled what Simon Baron-Cohen and others have written about autistic people’s tendency to systematize and our love of routine, rationality, and logic. All that makes sense, and I can see how a strongly rational person would reject religious dogma if it does not seem logical.”

Obviously, none of this is universal, as with most topics related to ASD. While it is true that those on the spectrum have a higher chance of being atheist/agnostic, it’s not a foregone conclusion. I know how important going to church, synagogue or mosque is for a lot of families out there, and if you have a child on the spectrum who makes going to service difficult, there are resources available. CARD-USF has their own resource for this topic; View it here.

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