Florida's First Choice for Autism Support

Posts tagged ‘FLORIDA’

Water Safety is Critical

water safety tip

There are a number of swimming lessons and water safety education resources throughout the communities we serve through CARD-USF. They may or may not have expertise working with students with autism spectrum disorder. CARD-USF staff provide trainings upon request to various recreation programs, but even with our training, you need to make sure the instructors and programs you choose are right for your family. Please let us know if there are some terrific programs that worked well for your family so we can share the good news with other families. Here is a list of resources for all 14 counties we serve: swim lessons

Disclaimer: As a policy, CARD will not lend its name to the endorsement of any specific program, practice, or model that is offered for service to people with autism and related disabilities. However, the sharing of information and training opportunities are key functions of the CARD program.

Sensory Friendly Family Concert Series

CARD and The Florida Orchestra collaborated to provide a sensory friendly experience within the orchestra’s Classical Kids Family Series. On Saturday, February 21st, the first of the sensory friendly shows, families enjoyed a production of ‘Goldilocks & The Three Bears”. While there, children were able to touch and play with the various instruments in the ‘instrument petting zoo’. Pictures and social experience stories were on hand as well to help facilitate learning about the orchestra. It was a great day for families and a fun way for children to discover an appreciation for music.

Missed this event? The next one, Whimsical Winds, will be May 23rd. For more information about the series and the next show visit the Florida Orchestra’s website

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Transition Planning: It’s Never Too Early To Start

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This is the third in a series of articles about transition planning. This article focuses on students in middle school. It is never too early to plan for transition to adult life. Preparing a young person for transition to adulthood is a gradual process stretching over several years. You may find the “transition roadmap” for middle school helpful in starting the journey: http://flfcic.fmhi.usf.edu/docs/FCIC_Employment_Roadmap.pdf

Involve your child in activities that foster self-respect and self-esteem, and enable gradually increasing independence. This may include participating in extracurricular activities that build on your child’s strengths and interests, such as playing an instrument in the band, auditioning for a play, or getting involved in 4-H. Assign specific tasks at home, and require that the tasks are done thoroughly and on time. Have your child join you in community activities that help others, such as cutting coupons for an elderly neighbor, cheering on friends competing in a marathon, or reading to a young child.

Take your child into the community, and point out occupations and the tasks and responsibilities of the persons doing those jobs. Encourage your child to talk about the occupation he/she might like to do as an adult. Highlight your child’s strengths and gifts. Expose your child to experts with similar strengths and gifts, such as attending a symphony concert for a budding musician.

In middle school, your child should become more involved in developing the goals on his/her IEP, and in self-assessing progress over time. Creating personal ownership of the IEP is a foundational base in developing your child’s self-determination skills. By the time your child is a 9th grader, he/she should be attending his/her IEP meeting, and possibly even chairing the meeting by grade 11 or 12. Did you know that a diploma option must be chosen in 9th grade (as per the new state statute)? Your child should be an active participant in making this important decision. More about that in the next article about transition…..

FCIC Needs to Hear From You

The Florida Center for Inclusive Communities (FCIC) needs your help! We are seeking information about what Floridians feel are the needs and challenges for people with developmental disabilities (DD) throughout the state.

If you are a person with a DD, a family member of a person with DD, or a professional in the disability field please take our survey!

It should only take 10-15 minutes.

The survey will be available until Tuesday, October 21st.

Survey Link

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CARD’S 22nd Annual Conference

Save the Date

Registration opens August 25th! See you in January.

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CARD USF – Video Business Card

Learn more about CARD and what we can offer families, businesses and individuals impacted by autism.

What is CARD?

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