Florida's First Choice for Autism Support

Posts tagged ‘technology’

STEM Camp for Individuals with Disabilities

STEM_summer_flyer

For more information about the Summer STEM
Career Exploration program, please visit the link:
http://carrt.usf.edu/docs/STEM_summer_flyer.pdf

To register for this summer camp, please download the registration form at:
http://carrt.usf.edu/docs/STEM_summer_registration.pdf

Please email the filled form to: alqasemi@usf.edu and scarey3@usf.edu

For any questions or inquiries, please contact Dr. Redwan Alqasemi at 813-974-2115.

Technology & Autism

It’s no secret that technology has completely changed the face of society, especially in the boom of the past 20 years or so. We have things like smart phones, tablets, notebooks, smart watches, etc. which have made things so much easier for all of us. But how does this affect those on the autism spectrum? In what ways can we utilize this new amazing technology to improve life for people with autism and their families? It can act as either a learning tool or a great source of entertainment depending on the context.

Perhaps the most prevalent use of technology in regards to people on the spectrum is that of “assistive technology.” The Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1988 describes assistive technology as “any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially, off-the-shelf, modified or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities,” in this case autism. One good example I can think of is an app that one of my mom’s good friends uses with her son called “First-Then Visual Schedule.” Oftentimes visual learning is the primary method for those with autism, and this $10 app helps present a visually stimulating schedule that will help people keep better track of their lives. This is just one example, there are many more out there that do a myriad of different things; here’s a convenient list on parenting.com that features 11 apps including the aforementioned First-Then Visual Schedule.

Technology is not confined to the assistive variety, in fact many use it as a way to stave off boredom. It’s no secret that children with autism particularly love video games, as they talk about here, and with the rise of casual gaming brought about by tablets, there’s a never-ending supply of fun to be had. While tech addiction is a real thing and should be avoided, sometimes as a parent you just need some time to yourself. One of the best ways to keep your children occupied is to get your kid a video game system, or even just an iPad with Candy Crush, Crossy Road or Angry Birds, and they can keep themselves busy for hours at a time. Trust me, I speak from 21+ years of experience.

One interesting thing I would like to highlight is this little gem: Project EVO. It’s a therapeutic tablet game made specifically for kids with autism. Here’s what CBS said about Project EVO: “As they [the kids] go through the game they are supposed to skirt around certain objects while choosing others. The idea is to condition the brain to sift through and organize information in real time, requiring a player to stay focused on the task at hand.” It’s a very interesting concept. The game has not yet been released, but I look forward to tracking its progress.

 

  • G. Sosso

Funding an iPad and Apps for Your Child

iPads and apps are becoming more common as tools for communication and academic participation. The costs are still fairly prohibitive for many families, however. There are several ways to look for information on funding sources and other ideas for obtaining an iPad or iPad apps for your child.
These are just a few. Be aware that things often change quickly in the online world. Organizations, grants, and other opportunities can come and go quickly, so these directories, such as the ones from Autism Speaks, Bridging Apps and iTaalk may provide links to organizations that are no longer active. For example, the Babies with iPads program is still listed in several directories, but gave away its last iPad in December 2014, saying it was just too difficult to continue to raise funds as a non-profit.
Directories of grants and other funding ideas:
• Autism Speaks Family Grant Opportunities (collected info from various organizations). This is a very comprehensive list. https://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/resource-library/family-grant-opportunities
• Bridging Apps – Funding Sources for iPads and Mobile Devices: http://bridgingapps.org/funding-sources-directory/
• iTaalk Autism Foundation Resource page includes a list of grant organizations. They say it’s updated quarterly, so it should be fairly current: http://www.itaalk.org/#!resources/cqqo
• WonderBaby – 5 Ways to Get a Free iPad for Your Special Needs Child: http://www.wonderbaby.org/articles/ipad-funding-special-needs
Here are just three of the many granting organizations mentioned in the directories:
• Autism Cares: www.autismcares.org/site/c.mqLOIYOBKlF/b.4844551/k.9606/Technology_Grant.htm
• ACT Today: www.act-today.org/act-today-grant-program.php
• HollyRod Foundation’s Gift of Voice program: http://www.hollyrod.org/gift_of_voice

Other ideas for raising money:
Website Fundraisers – These websites will let you set up a campaign so that family and friends can donate funds.
• PayPal for Personal Fundraising https://www.paypal.com/webapps/mpp/fundraising
• Fundrazr https://fundrazr.com/
• Give Forward http://www.giveforward.com/
• The Puzzling Piece http://www.thepuzzlingpiece.com/
• GoFundMe http://www.gofundme.com/

Holiday and birthday gifts. Ask friends and families to give Apple/iTune gift cards instead of other gifts. Local businesses, community, or charity groups sometimes help with community fundraising by having special events.
Some credit cards give points that can be redeemed for an iPad or cash to purchase an iPad.

Finally, the Apps for Autism Facebook page will frequently list FREE apps offered by the developers, as well as the latest information on apps. https://www.facebook.com/AppsForAutism?ref_type=bookmark
Sources of information for this article:

Autism Speaks www.autismspeaks.org

Apps for Autism, Revised & Expanded Edition, by Jois Jean Brady, 2015.

Future Horizons http://fhautism.com/apps-for-autism-revised-and-expanded.html.

Online Dialogue and Inventing Technology Solutions for Travel for Persons with Disabilities

Join the ATTRI Online Dialogue and Help Invent Technology Solutions for Travel

 What if you could make traveling easier for people with disabilities by inventing a new app or technology-based device? Join this national online dialogue hosted by the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Accessible Transportation Technologies Research Initiative (ATTRI) and share your ideas about transportation and technology. You can also share travel glitches that could be solved by a new app or device.

 The purpose of the online dialogue is to gather input on mobility and transportation technology preferences and needs from transportation riders who have disabilities. By participating in this dialogue, you will assist leaders in the travel/technology field by identifying devices that could assist all transit riders— especially people with mobility, hearing, vision, or intellectual disabilities— to plan, navigate, and use transportation options in their communities, including safely walking around as well as getting from one station to another.

Participating is easy! Just take a moment to register, and then submit an idea, comment on someone else’s idea, or vote on an idea! You’ll see ideas posted by colleagues from across the country and be able to share your thoughts on technologies to help people better access transit. Maybe you will be the one to suggest the next big thing?

The discussion will be open May 15 – 30, 2014; visit the online dialogue site soon to join the conversation.

Please contact projectaction@easterseals.com or call 800-659-6428 with questions about the online dialogue.

 

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