Florida's First Choice for Autism Support

Posts tagged ‘TLA’

Farewell Dr. Berkman

Mixed emotions are in abundance here at CARD-USF. We’ve all known this day would eventually arrive but we didn’t anticipate it coming so fast. It seems like it was yesterday she was whispering the words, “I’m going to retire next year”, yet here we are looking at her last week as Executive Director. To say Dr. Karen Berkman will be missed is a true understatement. Many of us, her included, are so busy preparing and planning that it keeps us from stopping and thinking about the sadness of it all. Which is good, keeps the tears at bay for a while longer. After 16 extraordinary years leading CARD-USF, Karen will set out on a new adventure; retirement. Although we as a group couldn’t be more excited for her, we are sad to see her go.

Karen is the true definition of a leader. She is determined, forthright, and has the ability to inspire those around her. She has pushed us to great heights and constantly nudges us to think bigger, smarter and beyond by asking “what’s next?”. However, at the same time, she is compassionate, understanding and willing to stop at nothing to make sure we have all we need for the overall success of our work.

She has had such an impact on families and individuals on the autism spectrum. Whether it was from creating The Learning Academy for young adults to learn employment skills, to creating the Autism Friendly Business initiative after seeing a need in the community; she has the keen sense of seeing a need and from that creating something amazing. She was instrumental in the development of the Autism Friendly Tampa Initiative along with the City of Tampa and former Mayor, Bob Buckhorn. She served on the Governor’s Autism Task Force to help implement changes to the state. She also brought CARD-USF and HIPPY together for a collaborative effort to assist children with autism with the reading curriculum provided through HIPPY.

She has achieved much success during her time at USF. Her impact here at USF, CARD and throughout our 14 counties reaches far and wide; she has so much to be proud of.

Dr. Berkman, if you’re reading this (which I’m sure you are) I along with the CARD and TLA team will miss you so very much. We will do our very best to continue on with your great work and we will strive to make you proud. Enjoy your retirement and the crisp air of the mountains. You deserve it!

“Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.”

Sincerely,

Adrian & the CARD/TLA team

TLA Graduate, Erica King, Wins Big in Local Theater Competition

Erica

Erica King

We here at CARD are incredibly proud to announce the recent success of one of our recent TLA graduates, Erica King, at the 4×6 Fest. Erica’s internship was at PowerStories Theatre where she got to write, direct and produce her own play called Splatter. Prior to TLA, Erica attended Focus Academy, where she was able to hone some of these creative skills. Erica’s play at the recent 4×6 competition, titled Time to Get a New Car, won the top honor (beating 7 other plays), and because of this she has qualified to compete in the Tampa Bay Theatre Festival on September 2nd at the Straz Center! Her mother, Beverly King, a consultant here at CARD, could not be more proud, and the outpouring of support here at the office has been incredible. As someone who shares her passion for writing, I wish Erica all the best at the upcoming festival. Speaking of which, I sat down with Erica and asked her a few questions, not only about her play-writing, but also how she cultivated this amazing talent. Here were some of her answers:

Q: Where did your passion for writing come from? Has it been there from the beginning or did it develop later in life?

A: If I remember correctly, I think it developed in first grade. We had to write essays in our notebooks, and I’ve loved it ever since.

 

Q: When did your love for “normal” writing transition into play writing? There’s a pretty big difference between those two things, and I imagine the jump was a difficult one.

A: One day I just started typing up some scripts with actual characters. All of this happened when I was still pretty young, when I just wanted to make some cartoon characters I had created interact with each other. The Timmy Jimmy Power Hour on Nickelodeon was a big inspiration for that.

 

Q: You mentioned before that you attended the Focus Academy. Could you tell me a little more about that experience and how it affected you?

A: It was basically a school I attended twice a week. There were acting classes and other creative stuff. We’d all come together with our inputs and create a piece that had a bit of everyone involved in it. Then we’d rehearse and perform it for all the parents.

 

Q: On a similar note, could you talk a little about your time at the Learning Academy? What did you learn and what role did it play in your play writing career?

A: I learned a lot about interviewing at TLA. You can’t just go to an interview without a resume, you need to have references that aren’t family, and you can’t just be a Gaston and claim that you’re the greatest. As for my internship, I was an usher, and the only thing my internship really taught me was how to compromise on details of my play. I got to read one of my plays which allowed me to meet Brianna Larson, the producer of 4×6.

 

Q: Do you see yourself having a future in play writing, perhaps as a career? Or is this just your current interest that’s more fleeting?

A: I’m interested in both play writing and regular writing. I hope to one day be both an accomplished author and playwright.

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– G. Sosso

ICI’s Evaluation of TLA

“The Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) at the University for Massachusetts Boston conducted a one-year evaluation of TLA to explore its essential programmatic elements, and the ways in which the experience influenced student transformation. The evaluation included a thorough observation of program structure, curriculum, daily practices, and history, as well as detailed interviews with TLA staff, students, parents, mentors, and external collaborators. The findings showed that TLA influenced students’ personal growth and transformation, manifesting in a newfound self-confidence. At the end of the program, students described themselves as having greater self-awareness, self-esteem, independence, preparedness, and social competence. The purpose of this brief is to share the lessons learned from TLA to inspire similar programs and other transition professionals striving to optimize transition outcomes for students with ASD.”

Read the entire brief here.

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There and Back Again: The Learning Academy

It always feels special to be able to gain a new perspective on something, and my most recent project is a perfect example of that. For those who may not know, I am a 2015 Learning Academy graduate now employed by CARD as a writer/copy-editor. It was the Learning Academy (TLA) that provided me with the skills I needed to hold down a job and cope with the real world, and now I get to repay them for all that they’ve done for me. I’m initiating a project where I’ll be tracking the progress of two current TLA students, Sean and Lizzy. I will be showcasing where they were at the beginning of the year, and how far they’ve come by the end. But that’s neither here nor there; the real focus of this blog is what a truly visceral experience it was going back into the TLA classroom, not as a wide-eyed, eager student, but as an employee, team member and someone of actual authority.

I caught my first glimpse of the new TLA class a couple months ago, during their orientation (which I remember mine like it was just yesterday!). I could see the looks of uncertainty on most of their faces, as well as a hint of cautious optimism. I can’t speak for them of course, but I can safely assume they were feeling the same torrent of emotions that I was; apprehension, hope, anticipation, joy and courage in the face of this new chapter of their lives. To be honest, when I went up to deliver my speech announcing the aforementioned project, I was very nervous. I had practiced what I wanted to say in my head a million times, and I had no problems speaking publicly last year when I was a student, but this time I had to make a good impression. I didn’t just represent myself and my own progress; I was a reflection of CARD and TLA as a whole. Luckily, I did not choke under the pressure, and received a warm reception.

My second meeting with the new class was far more low-key. In order to get a good feel for how things are going, I stopped by for the last half hour of class, and let me tell you, I can scarcely think of another time when I felt so much nostalgia. It was very tempting for me to raise my hand to answer some of the questions Megan was asking just as I had done last year, but considering I was no longer a student, I knew it would not be proper. It is a testament to Megan’s teaching ability that despite the fact that an entire year had passed, I still clearly remembered the lesson being taught, its real-world applicability, and how we used it to aid us in discovering an internship that we could succeed at.

I look forward to seeing how this year’s TLA class will fare, but from what I’ve seen thus far, I have the utmost confidence in them. And at the end of the year, when they all graduate, I’ll be watching fondly, knowing from personal experience just how special of a moment it truly is.

To learn more about the The Learning Academy at USF visit their website.

  • G. Sosso

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